Carla Gannis – Garden of Emoji Delights

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You know what is the shizzz? Transforming Hieronymus Bosch’s Garden of Earthly Delights (above) into Gannis’ Garden of Emoji Delights (below)! I came across this piece at Pulse 2015, and was FLOORED, after seeing the original in Museo del Prado in Madrid AND after studying the original painting extensively at IU when I was getting my BA in Art History. I mean WOW. There are no words to describe my excitement for turning an iconic piece of art history into a contemporary, relatable, fascinating work of art that represents the 21st century – just as Bosch’s work reflected themes and issues of his time.

Take a look for yourself! LIKE WOWZAHSSSSS. Seriously. I am so beyond in love.

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Check out the comparissons from the original painting to the 21st century remake!

Original:

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Original:

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21st Century Gannis Version:

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Need I say more?! This piece totally is the definition of reworking an old master and giving it a meaning that is relatable to us today.

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The Venice Biennale – My Afterthoughts

What struck me the most at the Venice Biennale was how I decided I am a modernist and I don’t know where my he(ART) lies in contemporary art. However, with that being said, I still found pavilions and artists I do admire and found some pretty incredibly intriguing works.
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To begin, Ryan Trecartin never disappoints and is always a good laugh watching his drag-style videos. While to me they are never a bore, it is tres interesting to find some people were literally passed out at one of his viewing spots in the Encyclopedic Palace. But actually, knocked out. Unconscious. This was not my case, for I was avidly watching his films, as I always do. If you ever get the opportunity to watch one, DO IT.
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In terms of Pavilions though, my ABSOLUTE most FAVOURITE pavilion was the Netherlands Pavilion in which sculptures were erected out of clay and wood, amongst found objects. The sculptures were a combination of portrait like busts in various sizes, amongst a wooden table that had a clay sculpted lady attached to the front of the table, in a viking-ship like style. What happens when the clay dries?? But besides all this when you were up close looking at the sculptures they had incredibly strong facial features that captivated my eye.
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The COREA pavilion was interesting as well. The iridescent building was without a doubt eye catching, and yet the experience inside was polar opposite. For the “show” inside the pavilion was for you to experience darkness and silence in a room with a few others for a mere 60 seconds. Keep in mind though – you can wait up to 20 minutes to stand in what some may consider a closet with no lights and sound – so you could try and experience this at home  – although I do not recommend it. Your roommates or relatives may find this odd.
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Anri Sala’s Ravel Ravel Unravel video series for the FRENCH Pavilion (which technically took place in the German Pavilion – they made a switcharoo) was nevertheless intriguing, captivating, and moving. I highly recommend taking the time to sit down and watch the videos – just don’t lean on the walls or else a little lady will come and make you move.

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While I know there are 50+ more pavilions to discuss, this is what I have to share for now. If yo get the opportunity to go, make sure you don’t miss these works. Trust me. They are some of the BEST.

XX, DP