Rachel Feinstein’s “Folly” at Its Finest

Cliff House

Rachel Feinstein, Cliff House, 2014

Supermodel, sculptor, set-designer artist, and a muse of many, Rachel Feinstein has conquered several aspects of the creative industry. Mrs. Feinstein (married to artist John Currin) has now become an even greater cultural international sensation, with her FIRST US public art installation, in New York City, Folly.

Feinstein’s latest creations can be found in Madison Square Park. These whimsical like set pieces, reminiscent in construction to the set designed for Marc Jacobs for his Fall/Winter 2012 show however, smaller, brings a fantastical sense to the hustle and bustle of the Big Apple.

What appear to be cardboard cut-outs with hand drawn accents, these site-specific sculptures are contoured aluminium panels concealed with vinyl decals with graphite like doodle accents. These hand-like touches, to me, can develop a more personal connection between the viewer and each sculpture. Look at these non-functioning architectural fairy tale esque works and imagine them as drawings in a book you read as a child. Think Anastasia, Cinderella, Snow White, maybe even Alice in Wonderland – and now put a Rococo and Baroque twist on them. While these are not her references – these are what I recall.

“Flying Ship,” “Rococo Hut,” and “Cliff House” are the titles of the three works that you can find staged in the park until September 7th.

We highly suggest you see these before they are taken down!

 

GO GO GO!

-CHC

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Daniel Buren for Louis Vuitton

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Daniel Buren, a conceptual artist of the 70s, whose predominant work was that of almost protest art (especially in Germany when he was not allowed to exhibit in Bern in 1969 in the show When Attitudes Become Form with Robert Barry, Douglas Huebler, Joseph Kosuth, and Lawrence Weiner) has now added to his resume the title of being a set-designer for Louis Vuitton. Buren, originally known for his signature stripes – which he posted around Bern covering up advertisements on the streets as a political statement saying that he is there (and then was arrested for his acts) – has now turned his vertical lines (which are ALWAYS the same width – picture above to the left from my latest trip to Paris) into a vertical fashion show using escalators to bring the models down to the catwalk.

Well dudes, don’t think Marc Jacobs is out of the picture. He was the one that came up with the almost cubist theme pattern (picture below). And Buren was keen to work with it, even though he had a very limited amount of time to set the stage for the show. He took the challenge and we think it was tres successful! What a great example of how conceptual art meets fashion!

XX, DP