Paper @ Saatchi Gallery

image-13

Paper. Something we take for granted. Something we don’t realise has such value and importance. Something that gives meaning, purpose, and life, to something such as art.

Saatchi’s most current exhibition, “Paper,” examines different techniques in which artists have used paper as the main medium of their work. From statuesque figures (above), to creating water colour portraits of dictators from around the world (sorry I did not photograph it – it is kind of creepy to look at baby Hitler and baby Kim Sung II, along with Mussolini), the exhibition explores various ways artists have incorporated paper into their oeuvre.

Included as well in the show is something I never thought I would ever come across – an artist has taken paper bags, from McDonalds to Louis Vuitton (below), and has carefully cut out trees from the bag, which stand tall inside. I don’t know how to put it into words. But it is incredible. Such intricate detail in such a small space.

image-12image-11

Two other works in the exhibition caught my eye as well: what appears to be a room with an infinite number of kites attached to one another (below) created in brilliant colours is not only aesthetically pleasing to the eye, but the way in which it is created, through varying heights, widths, and such, is absolutely fabulous.

image-14

And last but not least is this incredible maquette city (below). When I first walked by the work, I was like, “WOW. These buildings are so small, yet create such an impression. It is like a paper jungle.” And then, when you look up close, you cannot help but look at the incredible detail… but to do so you must bend down and get super close – or else you basically will have an aerial view of a town or city like you do from an airplane.

image-15image-16

If you are in London this show is a definite MUST. It will be opened till the 29th of September so you have plenty of time if you are in the area. No EXCUSES. The show has something to offer to all kinds of art lovers.

We He(ART) it (especially after seeing that disaster of a show at the RA)!

XX, DP

The Old Becoming New: Barnaby Furnas @ Victoria Miro

photo

The subject matter of biblical stories has not been the main focus in art for centuries. Gone are the Raphael’s, the Botticelli’s, the da Vinci’s and Michelangelo’s. Barnaby Furnas, a New York based artist, brings these style of paintings into the 21st Century and fragments them in such a way that they take a new shape, form and function. Portraying this idea, the exhibition “The First and Last Lady” is currently on display at the Victoria Miro Gallery in London.

Furnas believes that “a painting is interesting to me to the degree that I can integrate myself in it’s making”. Furnas implements this idea, by re-creating old religious stories such as the creation of Adam and Eve, The Fall of Mankind and so on through his unique style. He paints these stories with vibrant reds, ocean blues, and sunny yellows. In addition through his loose brush strokes and allowing the paint to drip, it is as if the scenes have become abstracted and blurred – to a certain degree. It definitely is a modern take on an artistic and even religious tradition. Wouldn’t you say so?

Peace Out, K.

P.S. the exhibition is on until the 25th of May so GOOOOO!

Daniel Buren for Louis Vuitton

425651_4350597678728_1519278555_n

Daniel Buren, a conceptual artist of the 70s, whose predominant work was that of almost protest art (especially in Germany when he was not allowed to exhibit in Bern in 1969 in the show When Attitudes Become Form with Robert Barry, Douglas Huebler, Joseph Kosuth, and Lawrence Weiner) has now added to his resume the title of being a set-designer for Louis Vuitton. Buren, originally known for his signature stripes – which he posted around Bern covering up advertisements on the streets as a political statement saying that he is there (and then was arrested for his acts) – has now turned his vertical lines (which are ALWAYS the same width – picture above to the left from my latest trip to Paris) into a vertical fashion show using escalators to bring the models down to the catwalk.

Well dudes, don’t think Marc Jacobs is out of the picture. He was the one that came up with the almost cubist theme pattern (picture below). And Buren was keen to work with it, even though he had a very limited amount of time to set the stage for the show. He took the challenge and we think it was tres successful! What a great example of how conceptual art meets fashion!

XX, DP