Ideophonetic: The Flinching Eye Collective Brings It (and Then Some)

Let it enfold you. No really, do it. The sonic sounds and total immersive experience that is a Flinching Eye Collective performance will render you unable to be anywhere but completely in the moment. Ideophonetic, the performance for the Biennial of the Americas in Denver last week at Junction Box was not to miss.

The temporal, interactive, and sensory experience invites you in to not just watch but participate – to be in on the action just as much as it’s happening around you.

The lights focused your attention, the voices, noises, the symbol grinding, whistle blowing, turntable spinning, does the same. But wait, because it doesn’t stop there.

FEC

(Image from the FEC)

As more unfolds around you a better sense of Ideophonetic, what it is, and its purpose comes to surface. The FEC, their ideas and the ways they bring them to light becomes clear and just as quickly slips away…keeping you on your toes.

The performance was seamless and sonic, loud and quite, playful yet well crafted, simultaneous to a grinding halt.

As you moved around the space it changed, your attention shifted, the action carried on.

The a-typical instruments, the devices and machines rigged to create the sounds kept you intrigued. Their inclusion is unique and another feature that highlights the creative ingenuity of this crew.

When you’re part of the static that makes the sound you’re gonna have something to say.

Render me refreshed to have had the opportunity to experience a Flinching Eye performance, and color me still spinning.

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A rare entity, the Flinching Eye Collective consists of seven members: Max Bernstein, Adán De La Garza, Scott Ferguson, Tobias Fike, Ryan Wade Ruehlen, Benjamin Gale-Schreck, and Matt Weedman. Independently these guys are interdisciplinary media artists. Their collaboration resulted in the creation of the collective back in 2011 in Denver. They have toured in cities around the US and this performance was the first to happen in Denver.

Cheers!

NYX

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LACMA and The Getty: LA – “If you don’t know, now you know.” -Biggie

1369545754094.cachedIn what was my first OFFICIAL visit to LA I can say that I was definitely IMPRESSED with both the LACMA and the Getty museums. Both institutions have been mentioned throughout my studies and to get to experience them in person was well worth the visits.

Being more partial to art of the contemporary persuasion I had an especially great time at the LACMA. The James Turrell Retrospective (see image above) in particular was a HIGHLIGHT (no pun intended), something that I strongly recommend to anyone living in the area or heading out that way – it runs through April 6th. The works span Turrell’s lengthy career, from early works all the way through plans for a yet-to-be-executed project at the Roden Crater in Flagstaff, Arizona. The temporal and spatial affects of Turrell’s works can hardly be described in words, one really must be there in person to engage with them. In order to experience the energy and power emanating from these works, immersion is vital and the effects are unforgettable.

Aerial_Getty_Museum

The Getty Museum (see image above) is one of the most beautiful institutions I’ve visited to date. High up on a hill overlooking the city of Los Angeles, you definitely gain a sense of the extreme wealth of the museum (J.Paul Getty left no shortage of cash). Like the LACMA it’s split up into different buildings housing different styles of art throughout various periods in history. The highlight for me here was Hearsay of the Soul, a 5 channel video installation created by one of my favorite directors, Werner Herzog (see image below). The film is a compilation of etchings by Dutch artist Hercules Segers complimented by the music of composer/cellist Ernst Reijseger (also Dutch). I found this piece to be both unsettling and beautiful, capturing the sublime through the coupling of the etchings and the pure emotive power of Reijseger as he played. It’s as if he was translating the artworks through his music. This was for me, definitely a must see! 4.-Herzog

If you have the opportunity to get to LA and visit these institutions, you’ll be doing yourself a favor.

In the words of Biggie, “if you don’t know, now you know”…so go!

Cheers,

NYX

The ART I Saw This Year That I Truly He(ART).

After traveling the world to get my MA in Contemporary Art, I had several opportunities to see shows that I would have not come across normally. In no specific order will I list some of my most incredible ART moments that I truly he(ART).

1. Venice Biennale:942345_10200407645409313_901043945_nDays spent in Venice during the Biennale were NOTHING compared to Art Basel (Miami). In B E A UTIFUL VENIZIA, the Netherlands’ Pavillion stood out with Mark Manders’ Room With Broken Sentence. The sculptural works, which covered 23 years of the artist’s activity, curated by Lorenzo Benedetti, were simple, yet intricate. The works were simple in the sense that colour and subject matter were not shocking. Clay portrait busts and sculptural figures covered the pavilion, but were presented so you were not overwhelmed, and in an almost highly organised manner (image below). Although traditional materials were used such as wood and clay, what was truly fascinating was how the pieces were held together. For example, a clay sculpture of a female hanging off of a wooden table – almost looking like the front of a viking ship – was suspended by a wire string contraption (above). MIND BLOWING.Not only was the pavilion least anticipated by me, but several months later still leaves an impact on me today. 946683_10200407647089355_236647333_nThe Biennale was one of those events that was not about the PARTYING, like Art Basel, Miami Beach. Nor has it ever been thought of in that manner. It was about what each country could bring to the table. Walking for 12 hours a day, for five days straight was 100% worth me wearing crocs by the end of my time in Venice (I kid you not).

But there is one issue that is still on my mind. While some of you may know the main grounds for the Biennale are the Giardini and the Arsenale (where the Encyclopedic Palace was located), there are also some off-site pavilions – which I happened to miss out on. Why may you ask? Because although I was getting my MA in Contemporary Art, my PASSION for Modern Art will always remain. And so I took a trip to Peggy Guggenheim’s Museum. And boy, was that a worthwhile visit. Although Mrs. Guggenheim may have been the Mistress of Modern Art, who cares that she slept with half of the artists that are in her museum?! It is BREATHTAKING. Rothko. Warhol. Kelley. Ernst. Dali. Brancusi. Picasso. The list goes on and on. Need I say more? All I can say is if you ever are to visit the Biennale, make sure you take at least a few hours to visit the Guggenheim as well. Both represent history and culture that should not be missed.

2. Inside Out: The People’s Art Project:1385059_10201083899715248_288651712_nMy dissertation was about to be due, but I had the opportunity to take part in JR’s Inside Out Project in London. Was it worth the time? WITHOUT A DOUBT. Paranoid after hearing lines were hours long to get your portrait taken, to then be wheat-pasted in a designated location, of course was a constant concern. But I prioritised with my art partner in crime (image above), and together we successfully were not only the first in line, but had a great time meeting others alike. People whom too admire JR, and were there for the same reason: to be part of a Project that not only means something to you, as an individual interested in the arts, but to take part in a global movement. This is something I had never done before, and if I ever have the opportunity to do it again, I would not think twice. JR’s staff is incredibly friendly. They don’t make fun of you for practicing your poses, aka taking selfies of yourself on your i-Phones and such to see what pose would look best, because the reality is you only get ONE shot. Literally. And it turns out, after practicing all my poses I winged it while in the photo-booth (image below). But hey, at least I entertained myself for a good two hours practicing facial expressions.                                                                       935974_10201083898995230_1309614194_ntruck3-20131006_141951

3. James Turrell’s Aten Reign (2013):1003170_10200663410643284_1123671427_nLuckily, I was in NYC to see Turrell’s first SOLO show in a New York museum since 1980, at the Guggenheim (WHAT A YEAR FOR THIS ESTABLISHMENT). But actually. Turrell has always focused on light, perception, colour, and space. And what better a place to create a show than in the rotunda designed by renowned architect Frank LLoyd Wright. A few words to describe the experience I would say are: MESMERISING, CAPTIVATING, and SPIRITUAL.

Turrell plays with your senses, primarily sight, having colours fade between different hues and tones. From black, grey, blue, purple, pink, red, orange, colours come and go in a timely manner. Yet time is of no worry when laying below the rotunda absorbing this monumental exhibition.

1070028_10200663411843314_959533646_n1000219_10200663413003343_824181635_n1016934_10200663408203223_182170698_n1000441_10200663406963192_615031321_n          To be able to witness such a show was something I never dreamed of. I have always wanted to go out and see his Roden Crater Project, but to be honest, it is literally in the middle of nowhere. One day I may get around to going to visit it, but for now I am fully satisfied with Aten Reign.

Well my dear followers, that is all for now. More coming to you very soon!

XX, CHC (follow us on Instagram @CultureHeARTs)

Phantom Fuel: Navid Nuur @ Parasol Unit

6._Navid_Nuur_BROKEN_CIRCLE__2011_50d43d7d6c46b

If you find yourself in East London you should probably go to Parasol Unit. Currently on view is the work of Iran-born Dutch artist artist Navid Nuur and it’s nothing short of AMAZING. The show, entitled Phantom Fuel provides just the right amount of a certain push/pull aesthetic with works that invite you in and others that repel you just as quickly. With sculptural and installation-style works, the show pieces together a certain narrative which provides the viewer with an experience you can not only SEE, but FEEL.

In the first room you find yourself in a dark space, navigating an interesting array of LIGHT and NEON works. Traveling through SAND PAPER CURTAINS (it sounds about as pleasant as it feels… not) you come into the next space, light I may add, which presents sculptural works, an iphone video and even a freezer full of ice lollies. The exhibition continues in the first floor gallery space with more sculptural works as well as an eerily dark room. There is also work in the gardens outside. In order to not give it all away though, I’ll stop there.

Something is present, driving you onwards and upwards through the space and it’s that something that follows you when you leave. Perhaps its the broad combination of STYLES. Or perhaps it is the juxtaposition between LIGHT and DARK spaces you find yourself in. Or maybe it just is what it claims to be: Phantom Fuel, something INTANGIBLE but POWERFUL which encompasses the mind, body, and soul.

The show is on until the 19th of May. We highly suggest you take a field trip and experience this Phantom Fuel for yourself.

Cheers, NYX

A Reflection on Dan Flavin – A Poem

Below the picture lies four lines, in which I reflect on Dan Flavin’s work that was shown at the Portland Art Museum in Oregon this past December. While the work is no longer exhibited, next time you see a Flavin, hopefully these words will stick with you and come back to life.

comprehending the colors

the brights, darks and lights

the neon shades of my love

that narrow down time and space tonight

Think about it. Ponder. Experience. Enjoy.

Cheers, Nyx