What You Don’t See in Yourself Other’s See… Incredible Sketches of Life: Dove’s “Real Beauty Sketches”

Long story short: watch this video to get inspired. DOVE HAS REALLY CREATED A POWERFUL MESSAGE.

Whatever you see in yourself is not how other’s see you. Have more faith in yourself. Love yourself more. Realise the world see’s you in a different light. We all need to realise that we are greater than who we think we really are.

See how these women describe themselves to a FORENSIC artist who creates a sketch based on their personal description. Then watch and listen how other’s describe what they see in these women to the artist, who then generates portraits based on the onlookers description’s. Whose sketch is more accurate? Tis INCREDIBLE.

XX, DP (follow us on Instagram @CultureHeARTs)

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WHAT the HELLO: The Interview

… and BOOM. Just when we were not expecting to see this BRILLIANT artist intertwined between slaps and throws in LONDONTOWN, we came across our new friend from Down Under: What the Hello! What a refreshing way to start the New Year! See what he has to say about his art and brilliant advice he gives you future artists!

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Walking around SoHo London, I came across your sticker (what I like to think of the popsicle man with two legs and an upside down face – see image below) which caught my eye right away. The detail and subject made it stand out from most other “slaps” you come across on the streets – no matter where you are in the world. What made you come up with this idea to put out sticker art as opposed to putting “slaps” with “tags” on them?

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Haha! That’s so fantastic that you see my character as a “popsicle man”, I’d never looked at him in that way before and I like it. I always kind of thought of him as a small man looking inside a giant upside down head, perhaps his own head and being pleasantly surprised at what he’d found. All a bit deep and meaningful.. and kind of wanky, but I think I like the “popsicle man” idea better!

Thanks so much for noticing my stickers by the way, it’s always nice to hear that people are noticing and appreciating them. I guess when I started making them I really wanted to create stickers that would stand out and promote my art, so I made them big, colourful and kooky, and hand coloured them all so that each and every one is an individual piece of my art. 

I don’t think “slaps” with “tags” are really my thing anymore, I grew up doing graffiti so I get the whole “tagging” thing but I’m just more interested in the art now. I definitely want people to recognise my name “What_the_Hello”, but it’s more important to me that people recognise my artwork. 

Well with characters like yours, your work is highly noticeable! Where does your inspiration come from? What subjects are you most inclined to work with? Basically, how would you describe yourself as an artist?

As an artist I think most of my inspiration comes from pop culture both past and present. Of course I’m inspired by other artists, but also things like the cartoons I use to watch as a kid, the comic books I would read under my bedcovers at night, the artwork on lolly wrappers at the local milk bar etc. I always try to create images that give you that feeling of familiarity, not a tangible feeling, but more of a feeling that somehow it relates to you or your life.

We see that your art has infiltrated the apparel industry (see below) and you often refer to your work as illustrations. You have been named “Lurzer’s 200 Best Illustrators Worldwide amongst others” and have been featured in Rolling Stone! That is a major accomplishment! Do you have advice on how to get your art out there? tee 2

I studied Illustration at NMIT in Melbourne back in 2003 which is probably why I still refer to my artwork as “Illustration,” but I kind of do bit of everything these days from tee shirt design and graphics all the way through to mural artwork. The best advise I could give to anyone trying to get there work out there is to be as prolific as humanly possible, just be a part of everything and anything you can be a part of. Today especially when there are so many social media outlets at our disposal, it’s really important just to be seen as “doing.”

Clearly, you have traveled to spread your art which we he(ART). While I found your sticker art in London as mentioned before, I know you are based in Melbourne. What is the art scene like down under?! I’ve never been!

Melbourne has a brilliant art scene and there is so much happening here all the time, the only trick is knowing how to find it all. Besides having a thriving street art scene which is there for all to see, Melbourne has loads of little galleries and exhibitions popping up around town all the time so keeping an eye out and an ear to the ground is essential.

Fabulous! Hopefully I will get to go and check out the scene in the near future. However, last but an intricate part of being able to interact with your art, where can we purchase or see your latest works?!

The best way to see some more of my artwork is by checking out my website www.whatthehello.net or by following me on Instagram @what_the_hello. You can get your hands on some of my hand coloured stickers, original art and giclée prints at my Etsy shop via my website. 

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Well kids, there ya have it! What the Hello here to inspire us all. No matter what passion you wish to pursue, remember to follow your He(ART).

XX, DP (follow us on instagram @CultureHeARTs)

Overreaction is a Bloody Understatement – An Example of How NOT to Take Criticism

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Everyone has the right to critique. Just “artists” or artists take it a little too personally, sometimes. Wanna be dramatic? Take it and break it. See for yourself.

But seriously, if you love what you do, why do you care what other people think? It’s just an opinion. This is not the difference between life and death.

And – Dear Girl in the Video with your “abstract” painting, you are already a fashion designer apparently, so you are established. I understand you spent a lot of time on that piece and went out of your comfort zone – but was this really necessary? Obviously you got upset and had the right to be since this painting was so personal to you that you started cursing and slammed the canvas against the wall after you kicked the frame. Maybe you should just stick to fashion?

Kids, at the end of the day… do what you do best. Follow your He(ART). Don’t listen to what other people have to say. Believe in yourself.

XX, DP

Jimmy C: The Interview

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Dearest CultureHe(ART)s – we know it has been a long time since we last posted, so we decided to come back with a BANG! SURPRISE! We got to interview the UTTERLY TALENTED Street Artist Jimmy C! Check it out!

You were born in England but grew up in Australia and studied down under, yet we see so much of your work in London… do you have just as much work up in Australia? What is the street art scene like there? I did used to have quite of work in Australia but a lot of it is probably covered over now. I was involved in the graffiti scene in Australia when I was younger, so painted a lot of walls at that time, mainly along the railway lines. I later went on to do commissioned mural works, so some of these walls are probably still up in various locations.

In relation to the street art scene, I was part of the graffiti scene back then, which was an exciting and energetic new art form at that time. It enabled me to find good friends like a family on the street. From what I have seen, the current street art scene is strong with many good artists, and I will aim to go back soon to visit.

How did you come across your infamous technique of drip/pointillist with spray paint? It looks incredibly difficult to master none the less, yet you execute it brilliantly! Does this inspiration come from Impressionism or did you come across it trying to break away from traditional types of street art? Also, do you create works in other techniques with spray paint or are you solely dedicated to your pointillist/drip technique? Thank you for your comments on this, and I first starting working with the dots when I was doing a lot of community arts workshops and mural projects in Australia. In one project I worked with an aboriginal artist who was working with the traditional dot painting technique and he asked me if it would be possible to do this on a wall with spray paint, and I said, I can’t see why not. I showed him how to make dots with the spray can and we went on to paint a wall together, combining our two styles. This led me to start thinking about dots and how to make images in this way. As my background was in figurative realism, my experimentation with the dots came to resemble a form of Impressionism or Pointillism with the spray can. In 2004 I made a series of work which I titled the Aerosol Pointillist series, but I felt that just working in dots was not really enough, which then led me to experiment with drips. That’s when I felt that I had found something more unique and personal, which I came to call the Drip Paintings, which were images made from layers of individual drips of spray paint. I also use a similar technique with lines that I call the scribble paintings. 

The works we have seen of yours are portraits of people – besides the famous people like David Bowie… who are these people? Do you know them or are they random by standards? What does it mean to you to create a portrait? And why do you choose mainly portraiture as your subject over other subjects? The human subject is the main source of inspiration behind my work, and almost all the portraits I have painted are from people I have met or had some kind of interaction with. The human subject in the context of the city is of particular interest to me, and I am trying to convey an essence of the human spirit through my painting with the consideration of hope, resilience, and compassion. I am also part of a tradition trying to seek new approaches to portraiture through painting.

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What is your favourite city to work in? What is your favourite mural you have done? I like painting here in London, and travelling to paint is always a good experience. I have painted in many cities and have great memories, which is so often connected to the people you meet at the time. One of my favourite walls is at 5 Pointz (a) in New York, as it was an honour to have worked in a place that has always celebrated the culture and diversity of styles from the hip hop tradition. Another favourite wall is in Hasselt in Belgium (b), where I got to form some great friendships. 

A:

66. 5 Pointz, New York 2011 Aerosol sur mur

B:

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How do you define your style? A socio-poetical dripping (he)art.

What galleries represent you/where can your work be purchased?! We would love to know! Also, where can our followers follow YOU on social media? What are your twitter/facebook/instagram accounts for our dear friends to keep up with you on the reg(ular). I work with a gallery in Melbourne, Australia called Lindberg Galleries, and also a gallery in Lille in France called Galerie Raison d’Art. Work can also be purchased directly from my studio in London.

For more information check out Jimmy C’s website, LIKE his Facebook page, and lastly, FOLLOW him on Twitter @akajimmyc and Instagram akajimmyc.

Check out some more of his works below!

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WOW. WOW. WOW. WOWWWWWWWW. THANK YOU JIMMY C for taking time to participate in the interview and for sharing your he(ART) with us!

XX, DP and the CultureHe(ART)s Team

p.s. Follow us on Instagram: CultureHeARTs

#RIPREEFA RALLY and HOW TO HELP HONOR HIS LEGACY

A FIRSTHAND ACCOUNT OF WHAT WENT ON AT THE #RIPREEFA RALLY via our friend Jane S. (instagram – spindalis305):reefa1

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On Saturday afternoon hundreds of friends, family, and community members gathered together on the corner of 71st and Collins in Miami Beach to honor our dear friend Israel Hernandez taken from us way too soon at the age of 17.  His crime?  Doing what he loved most creating art. Despite the oppressive heat of a typical Miami day in August, legions of people came together to talk about and celebrate Israel and share memories, and tell how important how he was in their lives.  It was unbelievable to hear how a 17 year old young man could have touched so many lives in such a short time. He was a very active participant in the Miami skateboard scene, art, and graffiti communities. We gathered peacefully despite our anger and outrage. One by one, friends and family spoke about Israel and his art and what an amazing person he was. At the family’s request there was no chanting—only a bit at the end of” no justice no peace.” Local residents spoke about what a blight the abandoned McDonalds building is and expressed outrage that such a tragedy could occur over a kid putting up a little bit of art. So many of the most well-known graffiti artists were there (although very uncomfortably since they don’t like to be anywhere near a large group of police officers).

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Although the rally was thankfully very peaceful you could very much feel the tension in the air and how much everyone was suppressing their anger especially since we were surrounded by barricades and police as far as your eye could see. They were even posted on the rooftops of the buildings across the street which created a very eery and uncomfortable atmosphere.

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I have been spearheading an effort to help HONOR Israel aka Reefa (his tag name) by making #RIPREEFA STICKERS. This effort has been supported 100% by DONATIONS and I cannot believe how massive the response has been WORLDWIDE for these stickers. People all over the world are outraged that a kid could be tased and die for graffiti. This should never ever have happened for writing on a wall!

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If anyone would like to help honor the legacy of  Israel “Reefa” Hernandez,  I can be reached via my Instagram: spindalis305 and my email address 17stars@gmail.com which is also the Paypal address for donations. Please help us spread the word that justice needs to be served and tasing  unnecessarily HAS to be stopped. Thanks!
– Jane S.