Ideophonetic: The Flinching Eye Collective Brings It (and Then Some)

Let it enfold you. No really, do it. The sonic sounds and total immersive experience that is a Flinching Eye Collective performance will render you unable to be anywhere but completely in the moment. Ideophonetic, the performance for the Biennial of the Americas in Denver last week at Junction Box was not to miss.

The temporal, interactive, and sensory experience invites you in to not just watch but participate – to be in on the action just as much as it’s happening around you.

The lights focused your attention, the voices, noises, the symbol grinding, whistle blowing, turntable spinning, does the same. But wait, because it doesn’t stop there.

FEC

(Image from the FEC)

As more unfolds around you a better sense of Ideophonetic, what it is, and its purpose comes to surface. The FEC, their ideas and the ways they bring them to light becomes clear and just as quickly slips away…keeping you on your toes.

The performance was seamless and sonic, loud and quite, playful yet well crafted, simultaneous to a grinding halt.

As you moved around the space it changed, your attention shifted, the action carried on.

The a-typical instruments, the devices and machines rigged to create the sounds kept you intrigued. Their inclusion is unique and another feature that highlights the creative ingenuity of this crew.

When you’re part of the static that makes the sound you’re gonna have something to say.

Render me refreshed to have had the opportunity to experience a Flinching Eye performance, and color me still spinning.

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A rare entity, the Flinching Eye Collective consists of seven members: Max Bernstein, Adán De La Garza, Scott Ferguson, Tobias Fike, Ryan Wade Ruehlen, Benjamin Gale-Schreck, and Matt Weedman. Independently these guys are interdisciplinary media artists. Their collaboration resulted in the creation of the collective back in 2011 in Denver. They have toured in cities around the US and this performance was the first to happen in Denver.

Cheers!

NYX

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Weird, Strange, and Morbid: Charles Matton, the Unappreciated/Unrecognised Artist

Charles Matton (1)

I think in my previous posts, that I’m sure all of you have read and become dedicated CultureHe(ART)s readers – its apparent of my style of art (aka K’s style) exemplifies the WEIRD, STRANGE, and the MORBID. This is why when I stumbled upon the French artist Charles Matton (1931 – 2008), I was overwhelmed with happiness and curiosity. I want to share that with you. I won’t bore you to death with a biography and list of works, but I will give you a little rant on why I think he’s so great. Maybe you’ll like it, maybe you won’t.

What strikes me about Matton and his work is he was an innovator, a REBELLIOUS artist. During the Modernist period when abstraction was a predominant mode of painting and sculpture, Matton diverged. I think this was brave. He believed that abstract reality when in front of you becomes beautiful. He would paint bouquets, heads, flowers – and painting was not his sole medium. Matton has done everything from sculpture to collage to films, you name it, he’s done it.

Charles Matton (14)

What strikes me most about his work, is his undeniable love for reality and being able to find beauty in the strange, the foreign – whether it be morbid such as his masochistic photographs, his pregnant sculptures or attempting to infiltrate the minds of the great artists such as Bacon and Giacometti (he created some wonderful small collages of their studios that you can look at for hours).

Charles Matton died in 2008, and this is why I am writing about him now. I think he was very under appreciated and unrecognised due to the overshadowing of modernist art and his divergence from it. He’s a bit kooky and weird – but hey who isn’t? And as I always say, “if your not weird than you are not normal.”

Charles Matton (15)

What does your He(ART) think? Strange? Morbid? Beautiful?

Peace Out, K.

The Old Becoming New: Barnaby Furnas @ Victoria Miro

photo

The subject matter of biblical stories has not been the main focus in art for centuries. Gone are the Raphael’s, the Botticelli’s, the da Vinci’s and Michelangelo’s. Barnaby Furnas, a New York based artist, brings these style of paintings into the 21st Century and fragments them in such a way that they take a new shape, form and function. Portraying this idea, the exhibition “The First and Last Lady” is currently on display at the Victoria Miro Gallery in London.

Furnas believes that “a painting is interesting to me to the degree that I can integrate myself in it’s making”. Furnas implements this idea, by re-creating old religious stories such as the creation of Adam and Eve, The Fall of Mankind and so on through his unique style. He paints these stories with vibrant reds, ocean blues, and sunny yellows. In addition through his loose brush strokes and allowing the paint to drip, it is as if the scenes have become abstracted and blurred – to a certain degree. It definitely is a modern take on an artistic and even religious tradition. Wouldn’t you say so?

Peace Out, K.

P.S. the exhibition is on until the 25th of May so GOOOOO!